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The studENT - Life Moves Pretty Fast… Remembering AOM 2021 and Preparing for AOM 2022

  
Life Moves Pretty Fast… Remembering AOM 2021 and Preparing for AOM 2022
Posted on behalf of @Ashley Roccapriore, 2020 PhD Representative and @Andrew Nixon, 2021 PhD Representative
 
“Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.”
- Ferris Bueller
 
It’s that time of year… College football season is starting, undergraduates are rushing back to campus to make it to class in time, and you’re drinking copious amounts of coffee to keep up. It’s hard to believe that just a few weeks ago you were socializing (albeit virtually) with friends you haven’t seen in a while or meeting new people at the annual AOM conference. Now that you’ve taken a week-long nap (we all need it after we were reminded how much socializing conferences require) and are trying to get in the groove of the new Fall semester; it’s a good time to remember some key things that happened during AOM to set you off on the right foot for our 2021-2022 academic year. Here are four reminders as we make our way into the new academic year:
 
1. Email who you met
You likely met a ton of new people either at doctoral consortia, paper sessions, PDWs, or socials. It can be tough to remember all those folks’ names and can be super awkward when they approach you at the next conference saying how nice it is to see you again. Before you forget everything that happened during AOM, thanks to all the madness of the Fall semester, be sure to send an email to those you met and want to stay connected with. It can be as simple as saying “so great to meet you (or see you again) during AOM.” We would encourage you to include a personal note, so they remember you too; perhaps they mentioned their dog Indy (we see you Emily Neubert!) or they talked about how their research overlapped with yours (hi, Christina Koutouroushi). These are people that you’ll likely see at every AOM (and who knows how many conferences) for years to come, and developing these relationships now can be really helpful once conferences go back in person. If you want some extra tips, we suggest checking out our last studENT blog post.[1]
 
2. Mark your calendars for the next AOM ENT Doctoral Consortium!
This year’s doctoral consortium was hopefully the last virtual edition we have to experience, and thanks to the creativity and hard work of Marilyn Uy and Chuck Murnieks, it was a fantastic three days. Gaining a coveted spot at the consortium requires prepping your application at the tail end of April, which can be a hectic time with classes ending for those at American and Canadian universities. Similar to our first point, the benefits of meeting students with shared interests help build out your research community early, and this network continues to pay dividends as we enter the job market and begin the hunt for tenure together. The 2021 Doctoral Consortium provided us with invaluable tips on crafting research questions and writing, the job market and hiring, and even a Q&A with the editors of our top journals. We also elect the PhD Representative for the next year (kudos to Andrew for being elected as the 2021-2022 representative!), so if you’re looking to get involved, this is the best place to be!

3. Rewatch sessions you loved or missed
One of the best parts about online conferences (outside of wearing pajama pants to sessions where you’re presenting) is being able to re-watch sessions that you weren’t able to attend or that you really enjoyed. AOM recorded most sessions this year and made them available until the end of October for you to see. So now that you don’t have 102,371,203 sessions at 8am on the same day, aren’t extremely Zoom fatigued, and aren’t struggling to get into the session because it hit max capacity, this is a great time to go see sessions you missed. We’d suggest ones such as the fantastic panel at the symposium for Facts vs. Folklore of Founding Teams,[2] the ENT Division best paper winners during the Entrepreneurship and Small Business paper session,[3] the always insightful “Meet the Editors” panel[4], or the fabulous session on how powerful tech platforms are reshaping entrepreneurship and business models.[5]

4. Start thinking about next year (we’re all looking forward to AOM in Seattle!)
We know, we know, you’re still tired from AOM 2021. But as we all know in this career, things move very quickly and what seems like a far way away shows up much sooner than expected. With AOM submissions being limited to three papers/symposiums/PDWs, it’s always better to be ahead of the game, which means it’s time to start figuring out what you may want to submit next year. Perhaps you’ve always wanted to do a panel on failure with fantastic faculty (thanks again, Dawn DeTienne, Anna Jenkins, Dean Shepherd, and Amanda Williamson![6]) or you have been really wanting feedback on a new paper you’ve been working on before you submit it to a journal. AOM is a great way to do this, but the time between the conference in August and the submission deadline for the next one in January can move very quickly. Start reaching out to folks you may want to ask to be on one of your submissions early, as waiting until the last minute may mean they are already booked and can’t join you! Plus, this gives you a great opportunity to start networking with people throughout the year instead of just in August when we’re all “forced” to!

[1]https://ent.aom.org/blogs/shawna-chen/2021/07/08/the-student-shaking-off-the-rust?CommunityKey=fe00dbd4-230d-471e-a0ed-420a47166316
[2] https://2021.aom.org/meetings/virtual/SDua6heuPKmRqJPja
[3] https://2021.aom.org/meetings/virtual/zJa8cJqLHnTqTKENv
[4] https://2021.aom.org/meetings/virtual/zLHYoKbugnaije348
[5] https://2021.aom.org/meetings/virtual/Sp9ihp33AE2rPeCnE
[6] https://2021.aom.org/meetings/virtual/vXEG9Z5oXCah6LgBY
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